• 6th October
    2011
  • 06
  • 5th October
    2011
  • 05

Six weeks ago I was in Madrid for World Youth Day. There was Benedict XVI again, this time with 1.5 million young people, from all over the world, who prayed with him, sang with him, listened to him attentively, and cheered him affectionately.

When I got home to review the coverage here in America, I was not surprised to see this huge event pretty much ignored. One of the few articles I did see gave as much ink to the thirty-seven protestors (I counted them) as they did the nearly two-million young pilgrims.

The real news is that an eighty-four year old man, shy and cerebral by nature, can capture the heart of a nation that describes itself as anti-Church and nearly agnostic, with profound words about God, prayer, the Church, virtue, religious freedom, a civilization of love and a culture of life, a nation whose movers and shakers had told him to stay home because he wasn’t welcome.

But, don’t expect to see much of that story.

Archbishop Timothy Dolan (New York)

(Source: blog.archny.org, via bishopfeed)

  • 4th October
    2011
  • 04
  • 15th September
    2011
  • 15
  • 11th September
    2011
  • 11
  • 7th September
    2011
  • 07
  • 30th August
    2011
  • 30
  • 30th August
    2011
  • 30

rocny:

No Autumn would be complete without the annual trip to Stokoe Farms in the town of Wheatland, NY. We go as a family, meet friends, take Scout troops… any excuse to spend an entire day playing at Stokoe’s. Not only do they have a pumpkin patch (and Christmas trees, too!) but an entire family-centric play-place focused around farming. Games, rides, animals, food and drink…and only 1/2 hour from the City of Rochester.

While driving through the Village of Scottsville, be sure to stop by the Scottsville Diner for lunch, and grab a coffee from Artisan Coffeehouse!

» Visit Stokoe Farms website for all the details

  • 23rd August
    2011
  • 23
Redefining something that is to be what it is not defies logic and constructs an artificial reality that can only lead to more and more problems, and more and more fissures in the social fabric of our society. This was illustrated right after the Fourth of July by an article in the N.Y. Times entitled, “Who’s on the family tree? Now it’s complicated.” The piece put together a very real modern scenario in which one “gay” couple had a child by a surrogate mother, a second from a former husband, a third who was adopted with the result that children who were biologically related were also related by sentiment and were at the same time cousins and step brothers and sisters to one another. The “parents” then had to work out various scenarios to explain to little children who each one was in varying degrees to the other. This was all reported to us as “part of today’s world” with about as much sensitivity as a discussion of what happens when one child goes to Yale and the other to Harvard.
Bishop William Murphy (Rockville Centre)

(Source: drvc.org, via bishopfeed)

  • 23rd August
    2011
  • 23
  • 23rd August
    2011
  • 23
Many people in the world today do not have stable points of reference on which to build their lives and so they end up being deeply insecure. There is a growing mentality of relativism, which holds that everything is equally valid, that truth and absolute points of reference do not exist. Such a way of thinking does not lead to authentic freedom, but rather to instability, confusion, and blind conformity to the fads of the moment with which certain cultures around the world tempt our youth.
Archbishop Francis Chullikatt (Vatican UN nuncio)

(Source: catholicculture.org, via bishopfeed)

  • 23rd August
    2011
  • 23
Last year, 75 percent of persons who were put to death as a result of religious persecution were Christians. And death is not the only way religious freedom is violated. It is violated by unjust laws in Europe and the United States. It is violated by regulations that do not allow a person of conscience to “opt out” of acts and activities that are against a person’s or an institution’s legitimate conscientious objections. It is violated when government claims that it will “concede exceptions” to laws that are unjust. It is violated when politicians announce that no one working in a government agency may refuse to act according to conscience but must perform acts repugnant to their faith or conscientious beliefs. In the past few months I can cite concrete examples here in our country, our state and our community in which one or other of these violations has occurred. We must pray. But we must also be vigilant. And we must not tolerate infringement of human rights, human dignity and human freedom of religion and conscience.
Bishop William Murphy (Rockville Centre)

(Source: drvc.org, via bishopfeed)

  • 23rd August
    2011
  • 23

Call it whatever you went — “the Vatican,” “Rome,” “the Pope,” “the Holy See,” “the Magisterium” — whatever you call it, it does not “make up,” “change,” or “issue” new doctrines. It inherits them, receives them, “handed on” (from the Latin word traditio,) by Tradition.

Yes, it may rethink how the truth entrusted to it might be better explained, or more credibly presented, or expressed in a more contemporary way.

Yes, it might become concerned when it’s clear that a good chunk of people no longer follow a particular teaching or moral precept.

But it does not then call a meeting and vote whether or not to change the teaching.

At times it – “the Vatican,” “Rome,” “the Pope,” “the Holy See,” “the Magisterium” — might even wish it could change certain teachings. For instance, I would wager most bishops, priests, deacons, pastoral leaders, and maybe even the Holy Father himself has, at one time or another wished the Church could alter the teaching of Jesus that marriage is forever, and that one cannot break that sacred bond asunder.

But it can’t, because it didn’t make up the teaching to begin with.

Archbishop Timothy Dolan (New York)

(Source: blog.archny.org, via bishopfeed)

  • 23rd August
    2011
  • 23
Please pray for the Church in China! From the first century on the Church has lived through state persecutions and all kinds of infringements of her legitimate freedoms. She will never cease to proclaim the Gospel and live the life that Christ has given us in the one Church He founded on Peter and the apostles and their successors. This violation of the freedom of religion of the Church and her members is not new. But it constitutes an abuse of power by the state and political power that should never be tolerated and does deserve condemnation by all who cherish freedom and human dignity.
Bishop William Murphy (Rockville Centre)

(Source: drvc.org, via bishopfeed)

  • 23rd August
    2011
  • 23
It sometimes seems as if many view the Church as a political institution, with a new pope or new bishop able to set out his own positions and priorities the way an incoming president or governor would. Back in 2009, for instance, when I was appointed Archbishop of New York, I was asked by a reporter how my “policy” on gay “marriage” would differ from the “policy” of Cardinal Egan. I tried to explain, as gently as I could, that the responsibility of any bishop is to clearly and charitably articulate the teaching of the Church, not to establish “policy” on which teaching he will follow and which teaching he will change.
Archbishop Timothy Dolan (New York)

(Source: blog.archny.org, via bishopfeed)