• 22nd February
    2012
  • 22
  • 22nd February
    2012
  • 22
In defending the ability of human reason to know God, the Church is expressing her confidence in the possibility of speaking about him to all men and with all men, and therefore of dialogue with other religions, with philosophy and science, as well as with unbelievers and atheists.
Catechism of the Catholic Church 39
  • 20th February
    2012
  • 20
In the historical conditions I which he finds himself, however, man experiences many difficulties in coming to know God by light of reason alone: Though human reason is, strictly speaking, truly capable by its own natural power and light of attaining to a true and certain knowledge of the one personal God, who watches over and controls the world by his providence, and of the natural law written in our hearts by the Creator; yet there are many obstacles which prevent reason from the effective and fruitful use of this inborn faculty. For the truths that concern the relations between God and man wholly transcend the visible order of things, and, if they are translated into human action and influence it, they call for self-surrender and abnegation. The human mind, in its turn, is hampered in the attaining of such truths, not only by the impact of the senses and the imagination, but also by disordered appetites which are the consequence of original sin. So it happens that men in such matters easily persuade themselves that what they would not like to be true is false or at least doubtful.
Catechism of the Catholic Church 37
  • 20th February
    2012
  • 20
In many ways, throughout history down to the present day, men have given expression to their quest for God in their religious beliefs and behavior: in their prayers, sacrifices, rituals, meditations, and so forth. These forms of religious expression, despite the ambiguities they often bring with them, are so universal that one may well call man a religious being: From one ancestor [God] made all nations to inhabit the whole earth, and he allotted the times of their existence and the boundaries of the places where they would live, so that they would search for God and perhaps grope for him and find him—though indeed he is not far from each one of us. For “in him we live and move and have our being.”
Catechism of the Catholic Church 28
  • 23rd October
    2011
  • 23

In a righteous world, there wouldn’t need to be a post about this; it would be common sense and simple human decency.

Hazing, harassment, intimidation, bullying, cyber-bullying, and menacing, coercion, and assault are not acceptable and not cool. Threatening people and/or telling them kill themselves is pathetic. I don’t care if you are bothered by a person’s race, religion, color, gender, marital status, national origin, citizenship status, age, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, pregnancy or related condition, family relationship, veteran status, tobacco usage, or anything else. Get over it. Learn to respect people who are different from you. Learn to forgive people who hurt you instead of trying to hurt back. Learn to be loving, compassionate, and kind. Be tolerant, accepting, and open-minded. Learn to help others out instead of hurting them. See the best in others instead of picking on their perceived faults or leaning on your own prejudices. Be a friend instead of an enemy.

Be a lover not a hater.

Peace out.

  • 16th October
    2011
  • 16
How does the Church view other religions? The church respects everything in other religions that is good and true. She respects and promotes freedom of religion as a human right. yet she knows that Jesus Christ is the sole redeemer of all mankind. He alone is “the way, and the truth, and the life” (John 14:6). Whoever seeks God is close to us Christians. There is a special degree of “affinity” to the Muslims. Like Judaism and Christianity, Islam is one of the monotheistic religions. The Muslims, too, revere God the Creator and Abraham as their father in faith. Jesus is considered a great prophet in the Qur’an; Mary, his Mother, as the mother of a prophet. The Church teaches that all men who by no fault of their own do not know Christ and his Church but sincerely seek God and follow the voice of their conscience can attain eternal salvation. However, anyone who has recognized that Jesus Christ is “the way, and the truth, and the life” but is unwilling to follow him cannot find salvation by other paths. This is what is meant by the saying, extra ecclesiam nulla salus (outside of the Church there is no salvation).
Youcat
  • 14th October
    2011
  • 14

Are non-Catholic Christians our sisters and brothers also? All baptized persons belong to the Church of Jesus Christ. That is why also those Christians who find themselves separated from the full communion of the Catholic Church are rightly called Christians and are therefore our sisters and brothers. Instances of separation from the one Church of Christ came about through falsifications of Christ’s teaching, human failings, and a lack of willingness to be reconciled—usually on the part of representatives on both sides. Christians today are in no way guilty for the historical divisions of the Church. The Holy Spirit also works for the salvation of mankind int he Churches and Ecclesial Communities* that are separated from the Catholic Church. All of the gifts presented there, for example, Sacred Scripture, Sacraments, faith, hope, love, and other charisms, come originally from Christ. Where the Spirit of Christ lives, there is an inner dynamic leading toward “reunion”, because what belongs together wants to grow together.

*Churches and Ecclesial Communities: Many Christian communities on earth call themselves churches. According to the Catholic understanding, only those in which the sacraments of Jesus Christ have been preserved in their entirety have remained “Church.” This is true especially in Orthodox and Eastern Churches. In the “ecclesial communities” that resulted from the Protestant Reformation, all the sacraments have not been preserved.

Youcat
  • 9th October
    2011
  • 09
  • 9th October
    2011
  • 09

The soul will participate in God himself by performing in him, in company with him, the work of the Most Blessed Trinity because of the substantial union between the soul and God. Although this participation will be perfectly accomplished in the next life, still in this life when the soul has reached the state of perfection, as has the soul we are here discussing, she obtains a foretaste and noticeable trace of it in the way we are describing, although as we said it is indescribable.

O souls, created for these grandeurs and called to them! What are you doing? How are you spending your time? Your aims are base and your possessions miseries! O wretched blindness of your eyes! You are blind to so brilliant a light and deaf to such loud voices because you fail to discern that insofar as you seek eminence and glory you remain miserable, base, ignorant, and unworthy of so many blessings!

Saint John of the Cross (via fathershane)

(via sword-meets-rose)

  • 7th October
    2011
  • 07
  • 4th October
    2011
  • 04
  • 4th October
    2011
  • 04
The purpose of communism and of contemporary secularism is the same: to create a society where God cannot appear in public, to erase any evidence of religious belief from public life and to prevent the church from acting in history, confining the Church’s mission to private worship, carrier of a belief system that can have no influence on society except on secularist terms. In this sense, secularists in this country and elsewhere are successors of the communists of the last century.
Cardinal Francis George (Chicago)

(Source: whispersintheloggia.blogspot.com, via bishopfeed)

  • 4th October
    2011
  • 04
  • 4th October
    2011
  • 04