RainyAutumnTwilight

On the Internet, nobody knows you're a vampire

  • 4th October
    2011
  • 04
  • 4th October
    2011
  • 04
  • 26th September
    2011
  • 26
  • 14th September
    2011
  • 14
  • 12th September
    2011
  • 12
  • 7th September
    2011
  • 07
  • 30th August
    2011
  • 30
Fr. Barron comments on "dumbed down Catholicism"

badwolfcomplex:

This man is such an amazing speaker. 

And his anecdote at the end? SPOT ON. It makes me even more excited to help teach CCD this year.

“We’ve got a smart tradition. […] Intellectually profound, rich. We will not tell our own story [salvation history] effectively if we turn away from that richness. We’ve got to stop dumbing down our tradition if we’re going to make this story compelling.”

  • 30th August
    2011
  • 30
  • 30th August
    2011
  • 30
badwolfcomplex:

orthodoxbrit:

badwolfcomplex:

I disagree.
Schism within the Church has always, historically, been seen as a great evil. That’s why heresy has always been such a big deal. It doesn’t stop being heresy in modern times just because it’s dressed up with new names and gets it’s own “denomination.”
How can the splintering of a united practice and belief system, the division and hatred among believers, not be a grave scandal against the Church, against all Christendom? 
Christ didn’t come to establish one vague “religion” that may or may not agree among itself as to the nature of God, the path to salvation, the divinity of His Son, and the interpretation of His Word. Arguing that every denomination is just as Christian or just as good or salvific as another is perhaps an even more dangerous kind of moral relativism than that which claims all religions teach the same thing. Jesus Christ established one Church, one communion, one Body, against which “the gates of hell shall not prevail” (Mt 16.)
If there is not, in the midst of all the confusion and sin and satanic triumph, the one, true, holy, catholic, and apostolic Church that Christ established, then the gates of hell have indeed prevailed. 

Here is the interesting part.
Are you talking about Rome or Protestantism? Since from where I stand, both are groups which split from the Church via heresy, then built themselves up on more heresy.
if I were to take you approach then I would be ordered to dispise catholicism for the heresy it breeds, but as a Christian I see that they have faith in Christ and promote education amongst them rather than thrusting them aside.
In the Early Church many heretics denounced their views after a while in their monasteries after being denounced by the Church, they then were welcomed back by the Church. I know that the Latins practiced mass execution instead of this, but that is because it changed to suit the ways of the Frankish barbarians. I prefer the way of the Church fathers in the councils and Orthodoxy and apply their ways, and not that of the Franj, to Protestants. They cannot revieve the gifts but are still Christians or “people in Christ” since they accept him.
That is the different between the Church and other Christians. They are like an outbuilding of the hospital, less likely to revieved the care of the greatest physician, but able to recieve something or a medicine. It may not cure them or give them salvation (Only God can know that) but it allows them to know Christ.

When I say “the Church,” I refer to the Church Jesus Christ founded: the Catholic Church. 
Your last paragraph I completely agree with. It sounds like we both want the same things—unity—but you believe the true Church is Orthodox, and from my point of view the Orthodox are the ones who denied the historical, traditional authority of the Pope and broke from Rome.
See? Division and argument. It’s bad. It hurts all Christians. It hurts the True Church, whether you think thats yours or mine or whoever’s. It’s contrary to the words of Christ, the unity of the Body, the truth of the Kingdom, and we ought to work to solve that problem. If I was an atheist and saw all the divisions among Christianity, or if all I knew about it was Protestantism, I wouldn’t bother being a Christian. There wouldn’t be a point.
Hence, instead of denying the obvious reality of what the image depicts (the fracturing of the Body of Christ,) we ought to be pointing out that it is bad, contrary to Christ, and we’re working to solve it.

badwolfcomplex:

orthodoxbrit:

badwolfcomplex:

I disagree.

Schism within the Church has always, historically, been seen as a great evil. That’s why heresy has always been such a big deal. It doesn’t stop being heresy in modern times just because it’s dressed up with new names and gets it’s own “denomination.”

How can the splintering of a united practice and belief system, the division and hatred among believers, not be a grave scandal against the Church, against all Christendom? 

Christ didn’t come to establish one vague “religion” that may or may not agree among itself as to the nature of God, the path to salvation, the divinity of His Son, and the interpretation of His Word. Arguing that every denomination is just as Christian or just as good or salvific as another is perhaps an even more dangerous kind of moral relativism than that which claims all religions teach the same thing. Jesus Christ established one Church, one communion, one Body, against which “the gates of hell shall not prevail” (Mt 16.)

If there is not, in the midst of all the confusion and sin and satanic triumph, the one, true, holy, catholic, and apostolic Church that Christ established, then the gates of hell have indeed prevailed. 

Here is the interesting part.

Are you talking about Rome or Protestantism? Since from where I stand, both are groups which split from the Church via heresy, then built themselves up on more heresy.

if I were to take you approach then I would be ordered to dispise catholicism for the heresy it breeds, but as a Christian I see that they have faith in Christ and promote education amongst them rather than thrusting them aside.

In the Early Church many heretics denounced their views after a while in their monasteries after being denounced by the Church, they then were welcomed back by the Church. I know that the Latins practiced mass execution instead of this, but that is because it changed to suit the ways of the Frankish barbarians. I prefer the way of the Church fathers in the councils and Orthodoxy and apply their ways, and not that of the Franj, to Protestants. They cannot revieve the gifts but are still Christians or “people in Christ” since they accept him.

That is the different between the Church and other Christians. They are like an outbuilding of the hospital, less likely to revieved the care of the greatest physician, but able to recieve something or a medicine. It may not cure them or give them salvation (Only God can know that) but it allows them to know Christ.

When I say “the Church,” I refer to the Church Jesus Christ founded: the Catholic Church. 

Your last paragraph I completely agree with. It sounds like we both want the same things—unity—but you believe the true Church is Orthodox, and from my point of view the Orthodox are the ones who denied the historical, traditional authority of the Pope and broke from Rome.

See? Division and argument. It’s bad. It hurts all Christians. It hurts the True Church, whether you think thats yours or mine or whoever’s. It’s contrary to the words of Christ, the unity of the Body, the truth of the Kingdom, and we ought to work to solve that problem. If I was an atheist and saw all the divisions among Christianity, or if all I knew about it was Protestantism, I wouldn’t bother being a Christian. There wouldn’t be a point.

Hence, instead of denying the obvious reality of what the image depicts (the fracturing of the Body of Christ,) we ought to be pointing out that it is bad, contrary to Christ, and we’re working to solve it.

  • 28th August
    2011
  • 28
"How should we act at Mass?"

badwolfcomplex:

People really need to read this. 

I get so tired of the sheer amount of irreverence in the sanctuary. You’re not here to chat with your friends, or applaud the choir, or direct children’s skits. You’re not here to feed your kids snacks, or because you “have” to be, or because it’s a “social obligaton.”

You’re here to fall on your knees and worship the Lord your God, the Almighty Creator Heaven and Earth, and His Son, Jesus the Christ, who is offering himself for you on the altar right in front of your eyes.

And yet you’d rather shuffle half-heartedly through the communion line and then stop at your friend’s pew to giggle about inconsequential nonsense?

Give me a break.

(Source: fathershane)

  • 23rd August
    2011
  • 23
  • 17th August
    2011
  • 17
Bad or heterodox theologians, a “curse and affliction upon the church”

badwolfcomplex:

Instead, he said, much Catholic theology has become “an attempt by reason to pass judgment on the content of the faith as if it were of human origin,” with theologians as “judges who stand above the faith and arbitrate what is to be believed and what is not.”

That approach, Weinandy said, “sometimes undermines genuine faith within the body of Christ” and ends up leading people “into the darkness of error.” It also, he said, “inevitably produces fragmentation within the church.

Weinandy acknowledged that over the centuries, the Catholic church has recognized different “schools” of theology.

Yet today, he said, “the church is experiencing not a debate among legitimate schools of theological thought, but a radical divide over the central tenets of the Catholic faith and the church’s fundamental moral tradition.”

“This is not simply an expression of a plurality of Catholic theologies,” Weinandy said, “but the very disintegration of the Catholic faith itself.”